All tagged Sola Fide

Sola: Revisiting the Substructures of the Reformation

One of my favorite eras of church history is undoubtedly that of the Reformation. I am so intrigued by the events that led up to that fateful day when Luther ignited the fire that would soon sweep across all of Europe. Though many historians much smarter than I would be quick to correct that notion, citing several heralds of Reformational doctrine long before Luther’s influence came to the fore.

Sour Grapes & Stale Crackers

I’m a lifelong Baptist and I’ve always been in church. Both my grandfathers served as pastors at various points in their lives, and my dad still ministers at a Baptist church in upstate South Carolina. Consequently, my understanding of the faith and practice of Christianity didn’t come with much in the way of liturgy. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing or something of which I’m resentful — it’s just a fact.

Welcome to the First Church of Mount Everest

Our society is runs on achievement. It’s the fuel that powers our motivational motors. As long as we’re getting ahead of the next person, we’re fulfilling our purpose. Everything is a competition and this life is our playing field. I don’t think there’s a more pristine example of this than the recent phenomena of “overcrowding” on the highest point of elevation in the entire world: Mount Everest.

The Happy Fatherhood of God: A Sermon from 1 Timothy 1

In the heart of man resides a hatred towards God. This is mostly due, I think, because of the grave misconception regarding God that portrays him a grumpy old man out to get them. Most think that God is merely a lion on the prowl, ready to pounce on you when you mess up. That he’s only concerned with hemming you in and keeping you line. He doesn’t really care about your happiness, so long as you act appropriately. But that is not the God of the Bible. the Bible tells us of “the glorious gospel of the happy God.”

Ending With a Fizzle: A Sermon from Psalm 119

Psalm 119 is the longest chapter in the Bible. It serves as King David’s magnum opus as he eloquently describes the incredible refuge God’s Word is for him. It isn’t certain what occasion in David’s life inspired these words, but whatever it was it must have been a truly terrifying circumstance to galvanize the kind of resolve on display here to trust in God’s Word alone. But the ending of Psalm 119 is the most telling, the most intriguing part as this glorious psalm seemingly ends with a fizzle.

The Synoptic Problem & Sola Scriptura

When one refers to the “Synoptic Problem,” one is endeavoring to address a fundamental question in Scriptural textual criticism: “What is the best explanation for the textual similarities and differences between Matthew, Mark, and Luke?” (Baum, 911) How one determines a solution to this supposed problem discloses the source of one’s faith.

Gracious Unfairness: A Sermon from Matthew 19, 20

There’s a fascinating scene that appears at the end of Matthew 19, in which Peter, speaking on behalf of the rest of the apostles, makes the same self-righteous claim that the “rich young ruler” made to Jesus’s face only a few moments prior. It’s this erroneous assertion by Christ’s disciples that leads him to tell, perhaps, the most intriguing and unsettling parable of the kingdom in all of Scripture.

It’s Not Up to You

You have to believe me when I say that it’s not my intent to carry on eviscerating children’s television. I’m only in my late-twenties but I fear my online persona at times comes across too curmudgeonly. Nevertheless, the vocals from my 2-year-old’s favorite Disney Junior show recently assaulted my eardrums . . . and my theology.

Sola Fide & the Quest for the Historical Jesus

The “quest for the historical Jesus” finds its beginnings as “an internal Jewish controversy.” (DJG, 719) Early divisions over Jesus’s credibility arose out of the derogation hurled at him by the religious aristocrats that he was “possessed by Beelzebul.” (Mark 3:22–27)

Obedience That’s Already Finished

The rich young ruler’s inquiry to the Lord Jesus in Mark 10:17–22 (along with Matt. 19:16–22; Luke 10:25–28) remains increasingly prescient for us today. I would say that it’s most likely the hottest burning question on everyone’s tongue, even if it’s not explicitly admitted; that question being, “How do I secure a spot in heaven?”

Blessed Be Our Rock-Like God

I don’t think there’s a more beautifully written book of the Bible than the Book of the Psalms. When you read the Psalms, you’re reading the only divinely inspired songbook in existence. It’s essentially a collection of Hebrew poems and anthems that were used in public worship services.